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Good Things Do Come To Those Who Wait

by Shonali Burke on December 7, 2010

Boiling the kettle
Does a watched kettle ever boil?

Working in the PR and publicity industry has definitely made me a believer of the old cliché “Good things come to those who wait.”

I’m always tip-toeing on a deadline, scheduling interviews with little time to spare and getting my clients placements with no wiggle room for lollygagging. Usually the placements and results happen soon after I send my pitch, but other times it could take months, or even years, as I recently learned.

A couple of years ago I was interviewed by a writer working on story about how to land a dream job. I shared my experience, but never saw the story, until it magically appeared last week on the Northwestern Mutual blog.

I couldn’t believe it really and had to think back to when I spoke with the writer, which was quite a while ago. A great placement for me and my company, and also a great reminder of how wild and unexpected the publicity world can be.

It also provides a valuable lesson for those who get everything ready, all their materials organized and lined up, create an awesome pitch, send it out, and then hear crickets chirping.

It happens all too often after you send out a pitch.

You’ll check your email all day and then the next day, and the same thing — no response.  And next week, still nothing. You think, what gives? And then you make a fundamental mistake. You decide you can’t manage your own publicity campaign.

Here’s the thing, though: you can’t give up waiting, because good things do come to those who wait…and keep pushing forward at the same time.

Sometimes all it takes is another pitch. You can shake things up a bit by trying a variety of different things and you’ll stumble upon the right message that resonates with the media.

But don’t quit. Just like with anything you do, practice and hard work are key. If you’re determined and committed, you’re bound for success.

What’s the saying? It takes 10 years of preparation to be an overnight success.

So if you really want to make a difference, publicity has to be a component to your business. But it may take some time. If you want to be a household name, master the skills necessary, be patient and persevere through all the obstacles that might come your way.

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Image: Maria Keays via Flickr, Creative Commons

Twenty-year PR veteran Michelle Tennant Nicholson is Chief Creative Officer of Wasabi Publicity and co-founder of www.PitchRate.com, a free media tool that connects journalists, publicists, and experts.  Called a five-star publicist by Good Morning America’s Mable Chan, Michelle specializes in international PR, working regularly with the likes of Oprah, Larry King, BBC, The Today Show and other major media. Contact her at her PR blog, where she teaches tips from the trade.

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